Journal News

Further evidence on how to improve the care of women living with Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is urgently needed, suggests a new study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

thumbnail image: Call for Papers: Obesity and Women's Health

  In January 2016 BJOG will be publishing a special themed issue on Obesity and Women's Health.

Reductions in government healthcare spending in the European Union (EU) are associated with increased maternal mortality rates, suggests a paper published in BJOG. However, if skilled birth attendants are in place, the association disappears, highlighting the potential importance of maternal care, finds the research.

thumbnail image: Call for new technologies to protect women globally against unintended pregnancy, HIV and STIs

The global health community is calling for increased investment in the development of new technologies for women to protect against unintended pregnancy, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. A new supplement published today in BJOG, from the World Health Organization (WHO) and CAMI Health, focuses on Multipurpose Prevention Technologies (MPTs), which aim to improve the sexual and reproductive health of women worldwide.

Risk factors for sexual assault, including young age and alcohol consumption, must be addressed when considering preventative strategies, suggests a new study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

thumbnail image: New supplement to BJOG published today: International Reviews, Quality of Care

  Head of LSTM’s Centre for Maternal and Newborn Health (CMNH), Professor Nynke van den Broek, has acted as Editor for a special supplement for BJOG, which has been published online today.  View Supplement (free)

The risk of severe maternal morbidity amongst women in Australia is increased by lower socioeconomic position, suggests a new study published in BJOG.

Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published in BJOG.

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The gap in stillbirth rates between indigenous and non-indigenous women in Queensland, Australia, is closing, however indigenous women are still at risk of stillbirth due to preventable causes, find researchers in a new study published in BJOG.

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