Journal News

Women who conceive less than 11 months after giving birth have a higher chance of going into labour or being medically induced before 37 weeks of gestation. In addition, the odds of a premature birth are also increased for those who wait three years to have another baby, suggests a new study published in BJOG.

thumbnail image: BJOG at the RCOG 2016 World Congress

  The BJOG team is delighted to be attending the RCOG 2016 World Congress in Birmingham, UK. Details of how to get involved with BJOG at this congress can be found below.

Domestic violence by a partner or ex-partner during pregnancy increases the risk of preterm birth, low birth weight and small-for-gestational-age babies, finds a study in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). 

thumbnail image: Call for papers: Stillbirth themed issue

In January 2018 BJOG will be publishing a special themed issue on Stillbirth.

Depression in both expectant mothers and fathers increases the risk of premature birth, finds a study published in BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

A team of BJOG Editors are delighted to be attending a number of conferences worldwide in 2016.  

Mothers who smoke are putting more than their own health at risk, suggests a study published today in BJOG. Young men whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had lower aerobic fitness compared to those whose mothers did not.

Editor-in-Chief, Professor Khalid Khan, and a team of BJOG Editors are delighted to be attending the FIGO 2015 World Congress. Details of how to get involved with BJOG at this congress can be found below.

thumbnail image: New studies show no long term effects of antidepressant use during pregnancy, but risk of significant blood loss during childbirth is increased

The use of antidepressants during pregnancy has no long term neurodevelopmental or behavioural effects on the child, however they may be associated with an increased risk of postpartum haemorrhage, suggests the findings from three studies published in BJOG. 

Chlamydia screening for all pregnant women aged between 16 and 25 is cost-effective, finds an Australian study published  in BJOG.

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